Showing posts with label Guest post. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Guest post. Show all posts

10 April 2019

Bricks & Pieces: Jonas’ Highlights - March 2019

Another month has passed and so it’s time for a new round of highlights from “Bricks & Pieces”, The LEGO Group’s service for individual new LEGO® elements. Check it out:
BnP.jonaskramm.com

30 March 2019

Fairy Bricks auction: Technic Pagani Huayra BC

Our friends at our favourite charity, Fairy Bricks, have let us know about an amazing fundraiser coming up. An online Catawiki auction of a Pagani Huayra BC recreated in LEGO® Technic by Jeroen Ottens is taking place so that Fairy Bricks can continue their work of bringing LEGO sets to children in hospitals. To tell us the unusual story of how this has come about, meet Grum.


In 1983 at the age of 19 I had a motorcycle accident in which my neck was broken leaving me a C4/5 Tetraplegic. I was completely paralysed from the upper chest down with no use of my hands and very impaired movement of my arms.

3 March 2019

Bricks & Pieces: Jonas’ Highlights - February 2019

You may recall Jonas Kramm has decided to curate monthly lists of cool parts available from “Bricks & Pieces”, The LEGO Group’s service for individual new LEGO® elements, to save you checking the price and availability of the wanted pieces one by one. He's so nice! Here is his February update.

After receiving great feedback on my January list I have now added the highlights of Bricks & Pieces in February. As always you can find it on:
BnP.jonaskramm.com

17 February 2019

Brickset: A history of Technic pins

Occasionally we see an article about LEGO® parts that we love so much, we republish it here on New Elementary. (With permission, naturally!) Well our good friend Huw Millington of Brickset wrote this great rundown about the humble Technic pin and we definitely didn't want any of you to miss out.

I can't quite believe I'm writing an article on such a seemingly mundane subject as the history of Technic pins but, given the popularity of last week's article about one such pin, perhaps there'll be similar interest in this one too.

The first Technic sets launched in 1977 came with just one type of pin; however, the very first 'Technic' pin produced predated them by some 7 years, and it wasn't made from plastic...

14 February 2019

Bricks & Pieces: Jonas’ Highlights - January 2019

We love highlighting new elements here at New Elementary and one of our regular contributors, Jonas Kramm, has recently started doing a really useful thing for LEGO® fans that we wanted you to know about: curating lists of the best new and recoloured parts he finds on on Bricks & Pieces. We asked him to introduce it to you.

The LEGO Group’s own service “Bricks & Pieces” is one of the sources to get your hands on individual new LEGO elements. It’s very up to date, not limited in quantities and has reasonable prices. But the main hindrance is that checking the price and availability of the wanted pieces one by one takes forever.


2 November 2017

Old Bricks: What is Modulex?

Back in the 1960s the LEGO® Group created a new kind of brick, for adults. Self-confessed LEGO history geek Francesco Spreafico has kindly agreed to translate another of his great articles for us, which he first published in Italian on his excellent blog Old Bricks.

In past articles I mentioned Modulex bricks a few times, but I never fully explained what these bricks actually were; I think that now the time has come to write a brief introduction about them.

At the beginning of the 1960s Godtfred Kirk Christiansen had to design a real building and, as an extension to regular drawings, he created a physical model of the building using LEGO® bricks. Since he had found this process to be very useful, he decided to have a new system developed, a system that was not compatible with the LEGO System, but that was optimised for this kind of architectural design. These new bricks – the Modulex bricks – were put on the market in 1963 and they were intended only for architects, the category they had been created for.


3 August 2017

Rambling Brick: Underneath the Arches

We love a good arch brick here at New Elementary, so when our good friend Richard Jones posted this article on his excellent blog The Rambling Brick recently, we just had to share. He's kindly allowed us to re-post it here as a guest post.

One of the great things about LEGO® bricks is the system: the way elements fit together and interact with each other, sometimes in unexpected ways.  Studs and tubes are easy to understand. As are minifigure hands and the way they plug into the end of a tube or anti stud, or clip over a 3.18mm bar. Every so often you come across a new set of interactions, and wonder just how far these relationships between elements extend.

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12 March 2017

Old Bricks: Brick Yellow & Brick Red

Francesco Spreafico returns with another guest post today containing more interesting historical facts about LEGO® colours. Francesco first published this article in Italian on his excellent blog Old Bricks.

About a year and a half ago, Kevin Hinkle of the LEGO® community engagement team told us a bit of trivia he had heard from his colleagues in the Materials and Research & Development department: the reason why the LEGO colour that is commonly called “Tan” is officially called “Brick Yellow”.

30 January 2017

Old Bricks: 5 Classic LEGO® Colours

LEGO® fans of a certain age will fondly recall the vintage 1960s/'70s LEGO logo that Francesco Spreafico is discussing today but may be surprised to learn it made further appearances in later decades, and even one in 2016. Francesco first published this article in Italian on his excellent blog Old Bricks.

The LEGO® logo has changed many times over the years, and around 1963-1965 they adopted the square shape that it still has today. Next to this square you could find another one, with a "rainbow" made of five coloured stripes: yellow, red, blue, white and black. These five colours were used together with the LEGO logo until 1973 and they kept using them for years even after that, without the LEGO logo.


But what are these colours? You might have read a few different explanations for them, but more often than not these explanations are incorrect or only partially correct.

8 January 2017

Old Bricks: LEGO® Minitalia

We have another historical article by Francesco Spreafico today, which he first published in Italian on his excellent blog Old Bricks.

In 1970 a new LEGO® theme debuted in Italy, and only in Italy. It was called "Minitalia" and you might have heard of it or stumbled across a few bricks from those sets... strange bricks that don't really look like LEGO bricks, even though they're perfectly compatible. It's very easy today to find people, even here in Italy, finding some of those bricks and asking what kind of strange clone they are. They aren't, they are 100% LEGO.