9 June 2017

Lettering contest: Entries (Vol.2)

It seems the range of imaginative ideas in our LEGO® lettering contest is blowing you guys away too - and here is the second bunch of entries for your delectation! Click any image to view larger.

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Steven Throm


"I designed the letters to have a keystone that is located as far to the upper left as possible. It is with a 45 degree angle or a quarter round. Each letter fits into a 4 stub by 5 stud rectangle."



ELIJAH SMITH



Brian D'Agostine




Brian D'Agostine

"You implied that pieces didn't have to follow real world build convention so here ya go :-)"


Brian D'Agostine

"Nexoredo!"


Alvaro Garcia

"Like the first one I submitted [see yesterday's post], but with a smoother N, as Scrubs from mecabricks suggested me"


Nicolas Jarraud

Simple font 5 studs high using angled and round pieces.


Matteo Russolillo



Brian D'Agostine


"Looks kind of like Dr. Mario! I also included a full alphabet for kicks. Any guess what the final letter could be?"


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10 comments:

  1. Could the final letter be the Eszett?

    Although Brian D'Agostine doesn't sound particularly German...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%9F

    /Håkan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Although for a German alphabet, I'd say the umlauted variants would be more important. ÄÖÜ

      Seems like the flower plate is available in trans clear, though, so I guess, for umlauts, that could be combined with the cherry part (although that's only available in a handful of colors).

      /Håkan

      Delete
    2. Ja, mein Familie ist Italienisch aber ich auf Hochschule Deutsch gelernt. Ich gern deine idea für die Umlaute.

      Delete
    3. My German is pretty rusty, but I think it should be "Ich mag deine Idée für die Umlaute." (or something similar...)

      Although I'm not sure if the answer indicated that my guess would be correct?...

      /Håkan

      Delete
    4. You're probably right. I think gern needs haben. Yes, my response in German was a subtle acknowledgement that I was thinking esszet when I added that character. Tschuß!

      Delete
    5. And "gelernt" probably needs "haben", as well. ("Ich habe auf Hochschule Deutsch gelernt.")

      But it seems I guessed correctly. That was unexpected!

      /Håkan

      Delete
  2. My guess is that the final letter is a &

    ReplyDelete
  3. Amazing! How many more to come?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Alvaro's 1920's typeface looks even better with the one piece changed, and is once again my favorite of this batch.

    Again, two people (Steven and Brian) filled out the full alphabet. Steven's font and Brian's first font both use three of the five seed parts, but Nicolas is the first to use all five! Steven has two individual letters (pr) that use three seed parts, as does Nicolas (dn). There are ten new letters (and two repeats) this time around that use no seed parts at all, all from the same person, but one of those fonts is a complete alphabet, and by the looks of it the smallest font we're likely to see in this contest, and the only one so far that makes use of negative space to form the letters.

    ReplyDelete